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Utah State remembers student killed in bike accident

09/01/2013

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September 1, 2013

Utah State remembers student killed in bike accident

September 1st, 2013 Posted in News

By Mitch Henline

LOGAN – The noise in Salt Lake City was at full volume Thursday night when the USU football team took on the University of Utah, but for a few short moments during halftime, Rice-Eccles Stadium was reverently quiet when a moment of silence was held in remembrance of Eric Scott Anderson, the USU student who died in a bicycle accident Monday on Old Main Hill.

Since the accident that shocked USU’s campus, students have come together to remember and pay tribute to their classmate.

“I think everyone at first was a little shocked and taken off guard,” said Douglas Fiefia, USU’s student body president. “But since all of the information has come out, the students have just been so supportive,I guess there’s just something about being an Aggie and being a part of the Aggie family that just unites everyone. It’s amazing to see how the students have come together in support.”

Fiefia, along with other student leaders, wanted to come up with a way for the USU student body to outwardly show its support for the Anderson family. They passed out white ribbons on Wednesday to the students on the Quad and again to the students attending the football game on Thursday.

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“Everyone has been wearing the ribbons and it’s touching,” said Fiefia. “Not only for me, but for his family and friends who see everyone wearing the ribbons.”

Tuesday afternoon, the music department held a tribute in the Performance Hall for Anderson, who played trumpet in the marching band. It was attended by the Anderson family and many of Eric Anderson’s classmates and friends.

Thomas Christensen, a student who knew Anderson from playing with him in jazz band, also attended the tribute. He said that hearing the family speak made him happy that he knew Eric.

“You could see that his dad was very sad because of the passing of his son, but at the same time he would tell us stories about him and he would make us laugh,” he said. “Eric was just a really funny guy so it helped us remember him. He would always make me laugh, so it helped me remember that is who he was.”

When the marching band takes the field to play this year, they will leave Anderson’s spot open on the field. “It will be for all the drills for the rest of the year, as if he was there,” said Kellie Richardson, who marched in the band with Anderson for two years.

Fiefia said that he spoke with Anderson’s family and they are very appreciative of all the support that has been shown for their brother and son.

“His family was very, very appreciative to all the students and all the friends who showed up to the tribute,” he said. “A lot of the family said that it was helpful for the healing process and were just overwhelmed with how much support they’ve received.”

 

NW